Rose Shortbread Cookies

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So there is a coffee shop in Salt Lake City called The Rose Establishment that is one of my favorite places to grab a cup of coffee. They don't have WiFi so I never studied there much, but anytime I meet a friend for coffee and a bite to eat it is my go-to spot. They have amazing avocado toast (I know....so basic) and quiche but what I love most of all is their rose shortbread cookies. There is nothing crazy about them--the shortbread is crisp and melts in your mouth, the rose is subtle but there, and the icing is vibrant and shiny. Overall they are just a really great cookie and so I wanted to try and recreate them at home. 

Also, on the non-baking front, Noah and I officially submitted and certified our rank list yesterday for Emergency Medicine and Anesthesiology! It was surreal and exciting and nerve-racking. Luckily, we agreed about most things and there were no tears or big fights when it came down to making the list, which I was really thankful for. We both had to make some small sacrifices but at the end of the day we both prioritized wanting to be close to each other. We find out if we matched on March 12, and we find out where we are going March 16!!!!!! (O_o) 

Vanilla Rose Shortbread

  • *Recipe makes 6-7 medium, 3-inch round cookies*
  • 90 g softened butter
  • 45g granulated sugar 
  • 125 g all-purpose flour 
  • 1 g salt 
  • 3 g clear vanilla extract 
  • 3 drops rose water (I had rose water lying around from a cupcake kit a friend got me years ago, but I found it for sale separately on Amazon here)

Vanilla Rose Icing 

  • 100 g powdered sugar
  • 2 g meringue powder 
  • 30 g light corn syrup
  • 10 g water 
  • 3 g clear vanilla extract
  • 3 drops rose water 
  • gel food coloring in pink, red, and violet 
  • dried, edible rose petals (optional) 

Tools

  • 3-inch round cookie cutter
  • piping bag with 1/8th inch round tip (optional)
  • parchment paper 

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Cream butter and granulated sugar together in mixing bowl. Add rose water, salt, and vanilla and mix for an additional 30 seconds. Add flour 1 spoonful at a time, mixing well before adding another spoonful. Repeat until all flour has been added. At this point your mixture may look crumbly and dry--that is ok. Shape it into a mound and wrap it in plastic wrap. Chill for 1 hour. 

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While dough is chilling, in a small bowl combine powdered sugar, meringue powder, water, and corn syrup. Whisk with fork or a small whisk. 

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Add clear vanilla extract and rose water and whisk well. At this point the icing will be slightly thick but still runny. When you run your fork through it it should make a brief line before dissipating and becoming smooth again (shown below). If yours doesn't look like this add powdered sugar or water until you get this consistency. 

Coloring this icing was particularly difficult--in fact, I messed up 3 times and had to re-do it each time! But I finally figured it out. The icing of these cookies at Rose Establishment is this beautiful fuschia/magenta color that I have a feeling is made using hibiscus powder. You can buy this online, but I didn't have any. I found that I could make my own by using the colors below: Rose (Wilton brand), Super Red (Americolor), and Violet (Americolor). Essentially, any pink, true red, and violet will work. Start with you pink. You want to use the most of this color, get it until it looks really Barbie pink. Then add a small amount of red--I'm talking the size of a pinhead. Mix that in. Then the violet, start with 1/2 a pinhead. The violet will take it to a more magenta/fuschia shade instead of coral. Also, I learned the hard way to stay away from any yellow or orange. Since this is a purple-blue-based pink you want to stay away from anything that is the opposite of blue/purple. Honestly if you have a background in design or art this will probably be easy for you but it took a couple tries for me! 

The pictures below show the final shade after the violet was added. 

Transfer to a piping bag with a round, 1/8th inch tip. If you don't have a piping bag you can use a ziplock with the tip cut off or just spoon it on with a regular spoon. 

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By this time your shortbread dough will be done chilling. Line cookie sheet with silplat or parchment. Lay a piece of parchment paper on your work space and sprinkle it with a small amount of flour. Place dough on it. Roll out dough until it is between 1/8th inch and 1/4th inch thick. Cut out rounds and transfer to baking sheet. Freeze on baking tray for 10 minutes before placing into preheated oven for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes, remove cookies. They will be barely browned on the edges and they will have spread slightly on the pan. While cookies are still very hot, take your cookie cutter and cut fresh edges on each cookie. Then return to the hot oven for 3 additional minutes. This makes the cookies have a nice, perfect edge to them which I really like. 

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After 3 minutes remove from oven. Take spatula and lightly press down on the tops of each cookie. This flattens it and gives you a great surface for you to ice on. It's small but it makes a difference! 

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Allow cookies to cool on pan before transferring to wire rack to cool completely. 

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The dried rose petals really elevate this cookie to the next level IMO but it's definitely not a requirement by any means! You can make your own if you are lucky enough to have a rose garden...or you can buy them here which is what I did. I poured a tablespoon of the petals into a small bowl and picked out the leaves and the stems so there were only petals. I also crushed some of the larger petals up into smaller pieces.  

To decorate, take a cooled cookie and pipe a ring of icing around the edge, leaving about 1/4th inch of space. Loosley pipe in zig-zags into the middle, and move the tip of your piping bag around to fill in the gaps without squeezing more icing out. Top with 3-4 rose petal pieces. 

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I took a bite of one cookie right after icing it, so the icing hadn't set up properly yet, but even so I think the flavor was pretty close to the ones at Rose Establishment! The rose isn't too overwhelming and the cookie is buttery and not too sweet. It would be great with a cup of coffee or tea! 

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Thanks so much for reading! Xx 

Glazed and Embroidered Sugar Cookies

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I've made a lot of sugar cookies over the years, but these might be my favorite! I made these ahead of time for my Galentine's Day party, freezing the glazed cookies, and then decorated them with buttercream frosting before the party. I used this sugar cookie recipe which is my favorite because it is so light and airy. I rolled the dough out to a 1/4 of an inch cut them out using a 3-inch fluted cutter, but you could do any shape you want--squares, rectangles, hearts, stars, etc. After the cookies cooled completely I glazed them with a light pink glaze, dipping them in the icing by hand before letting them drip-dry on a cooling rack lined with parchment below for easy clean up. 

Pink Glaze 

  • 3 cups powdered sugar 
  • 3 tablespoons light corn syrup 
  • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 4 tablespoons milk
  • 1 teaspoon meringue powder 
  • gel food coloring 

To make the glaze, combine wet ingredients in bowl. Slowly sift in powdered sugar and meringue powder, whisking by hand or using a hand mixer on low speed. Add food coloring last for desired shade. Use immediately. Let cookies dry 1 hour, until they appear slightly matte can be touched without disturbing the glaze. You can freeze them, separating each cookie with a small piece of parchment so they don't stick, or you can decorate them. If you freeze them, take allow them to come to room temperature for 2 hours before decorating. The glaze will look very wet when you first defrost them, but it will dry out and your cookies will look like you just frosted them!

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For the buttercream, the consistency should be very stiff. Combine powdered sugar and butter in a 3:1 ratio (I did 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar and 1/2 cup softened butter). Add 1/2 teaspoon almond or vanilla flavoring. Divide white frosting into bowls and and dye with gel food coloring to desired shades--I did 3 pink shades and reserved some for white. Transfer to piping bags each with a different tip--I did 3 star tips, some open and some closed, and a round tip for the white. 

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The key with these cookies is to not have them look "too" perfect. Play around with the amount of each color, and the spacing of the dots. It looks best when the are all slightly different in my opinion! To make frosting them all easier, I went in rapid succession with each color, as seen below. To finish, I took silver nonpareils and placed one on top of each white dot for a little extra bling. 

Overall these were delicious and tasted like that Valentine's Day sugar cookie you remember from grade school as a kid! I can't wait to try different color variations for different holidays! I think red, white, and blue would be super cute for the 4th! 

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